Gastro campfire recipes – Tender summer squid with chorizo + aioli

Squid can be slow cooked or flash-fried – anything otherwise risks its tenderness matching Bernie Ecclestone’s racing tyre compound stipulations.

This recipe is a delicious example of a slowly simmered Spanish-style paprika stew with new potatoes and tomatoes served with a garlic mayonnaise–type aioli.

No better a comfort food soaking up a cliff-top sunset after long days kayaking — the closest link this recipe has to toughness or endurance.

Stew ingredients

– 200g chorizo, skin removed
– 1 onion, finely chopped
Thyme sprigs
– 1 tsp sweet smoked paprika
– 50ml white wine
– 450g cherry tomatoes
– 500g prepared squid, cut into calamari rings and whole tentacles
– 450g large new potatoes, peeled and cut into bite-sized chunks
– Handful flat-leaf parsley, chopped

Aioli ingredients

– 1 garlic clove, crushed
– 4 tbsp good mayonnaise
– Squeeze of lemon juice, with extra to serve
– 1/2 tsp sweet smoked paprika
– Bread
, to serve

Method

  1. Heat a large pan. Add chorizo and fry for 5 mins, spatula to break up
  2. If there’s more than 2 tbsp of oil in the pan, spoon out excess
  3. Add onion and thyme and soften
  4. Stir in the paprika, cook for 1 min and add the wine scraping the pan bottom
  5. Add tomatoes, cover with lid, simmer for 10 mins until tomatoes collapse
  6. Don’t season with salt, chorizo is salty enough
  7. Add squid, making sure it’s covered in juices, cover again + gently simmer 1 hr
  8. Add potatoes, cook for another 30 mins, adding a splash of water if it looks dry
  9. Mix the garlic, mayo and lemon juice and set aside. Sprinkle with a little paprika
  10. Test the squid; it should be so tender a spoon cuts through it
  11. Test the potatoes are cooked
  12. Stir in parsley and serve with a dollop of aioli, a squeeze of lemon and bread

Aioli

Aioli is a provencal mayonnaise like sauce made from garlic, olive oil, egg yolk and is served at room temperature. Its name aioli comes from provencal alh ‘garlic’ (< Latin allium) + òli ‘oil’ (< Latin oleum). The original recipe has no lemon juice, though many add it today. Some add mustard. Some regional variations such as Maltese allioli omit the egg.

Our allioli is a short cut version and, after a day’s paddling, it saves whisking.

Other squid and chorizo recipes:
– Squid + chorizo with rice, beetroot + apple
– Squid, chickpea + chorizo salad


Octane offers gastro wilderness expeditions and, employing Octane’s Eight* methods of sourcing wild food for the pot, we eat the world’s best food, ocean fresh**.

*Octane’s Eight is our philosophy. We believe our travelling guests, being closest to the world’s wildest fresh foods, might quite like to eat the world’s wildest fresh foods.
1. we line fish, 2. we lobster pot, 3. we spear fish, 4. we sea forage, 5. we land forage, 6. we stalk, 7. we seed the sea, 8. we seed the land. Why is it campers and ramblers feel obliged to consume biltong, baked beans and instant coffee?

**The term fresh fish is of course relative. On the high-street, at supermarkets and in city restaurants fresh fish really means days old so, when patiently waiting for your number to be called at the fish-counter, be ready to ask where your fish is from and how many days ago it was likely caught. Supermarkets invent terms to suit their needs and, as a discerning consumer, it really is your right to challenge nonsense. At Octane we have therefore made a new, differentiated and entirely transparent definition – Ocean fresh. Simply put, it means caught, prepared, cooked and eaten same-day.

See ocean fresh in practice with the post ‘Drive–by calamari’ – ocean fresh calamari caught, cooked and served in under an hour.

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