Baiting lobster

This is not a top ten ways to infuriate an armoured crustacean but more a useful post describing how to prepare tempting morsels for a lobster pot.

Whilst three day hung game might be many people’s gastro delight, a three week aged mackerel is sure to turn the heads of many a lurking lobster.

Giddy for gurnard

Just as humans like aged steak, lobsters go giddy for rotten old fish many people turn their nose up to.

Fishy familiarity

However, not all have wives happy to get to know gurnard quite so well. So, a sure way to age fish without it rotting is to place it in six inches of sea salt for two to three weeks.

Stop the rot

Ensure the fish is completely submersed and all sides of the fish are covered. The salt will draw the moisture from the flesh and stop it from rotting all the while. The fish will be dried, crispy, rigid and, most importantly, irresistible to homarus gammarus.

Twice as nice

It’s best to salt a few fish. Twice the pots, twice the chance. Also, with a number of lobster pots in a line, all dispersing the smell of aged mackerel into the current, the scent drift area will be wider.

Whiff

Lobsters ‘smell’ their food by using four small antennae on the front of their heads and tiny sensing hairs covering their bodies.

News travels

A lobster’s sense of smell is finely tuned and can sniff out a single amino acid that tags its favourite food from hundreds of metres.

Lobsters are typically local dwellers and keep to within a mile or so wide area – expect every lobster in the area to get news of your fish.

Big George

The Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association claimed a record when they caught ‘Big George‘ in 1974 off Cape Cod. The lobster weighed 37.4 pounds with a total length of 2.1 feet.

… we’re gonna need a bigger pot

How George fitted in the pot remains a mystery.

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